Production chains impasse

The urgency to make a change

Production chains have been disrupted first by the pandemic and second by the war in Ukraine. Which, unfortunately, doesn’t seem to have a short term solution.

And so, the question arises about how to reorganise the production system in a new sustainable way.

The most striking point is that the western world is set up only for consuming goods produced in countries where wages are below the standards which would allow a decent life. That is a dead-end system: corporations will never renounce that magnificent cake which secures their profits. At the same time, everyone worldwide contributes to sustaining that system by overconsuming goods.

With a complete lack of vision, most companies hope to get back to normal soon, identifying that normal with the pre-pandemic and prewar structure. But the war and the new outbreak in China added more problems, further slowing raw material supplies and destroying markets. So it just got worse. While disrupting production chains, those catastrophic events are bringing in radical changes. And maybe, even those companies who prayed for “back to normal” will understand that life will never be the same, nor will production chains.

Production chains – What are the possibilities?

Small-sized companies offering local productions are more prone to change and more adaptable to new situations. The big chains don’t have this ability to change and adapt quickly.
Artisanal should be the new normal, guided by the principle of going ahead with production only when there is a commitment to purchase. No overproduction.
Also, more focused production would give space to creativity, which is fundamental to conceiving meaningful products, goods made to last and worth buying.

Small, artisanal and creative are just some of the elements that provide a thoughtful and sustainable business model.

Of course, being creative means taking risks, so no one wants to do it because there’s no guarantee of success. But the catastrophic events we are witnessing tell us that we must change now.

In order to provide sustainable production chains, we need people leading the industries with innovative visions based on ethical principles.

Taking risks is part of the game. There’s no other way to make a change.

Chronicles from the Middle Ages

Women against women

“An entrepreneur cannot afford not to see a woman show up for two years, that’s why I often bet on men.”
Sometimes women can have a tremendously negative impact on women’s emancipation. You can see this by listening to Elisabetta Franchi, whose words sounded like chronicles from the Middle-Ages.

This is what Elisabetta Franchi said in an interview with “Il Foglio”:

“When you put a woman in an important position, you cannot afford not to see her coming for two years because that position is uncovered. An entrepreneur invests time, energy, and money and if a woman cannot show up it’s a problem, so I too, as an entrepreneur, am responsible for my company, have often focused on men.”

“I only hire over forty women who already have children.”

Daily life in Middle Ages

This is not men’s opposition to women’s emancipation. This is women against women.
For what is our vision of fashion, Elisabetta Franchi has never been under our radar. Style speaks, and her fashion perfectly represents her worldview, which is explained above. A tacky style for women who dress to impress men. That’s what society and tradition want, so let’s give it to them. And so, we witness the same old patriarchal rhetoric depicted through clothing. A regressive representation of the female who has no career opportunities but can count on attracting men.

Something we would never offer to our women. But what we find sad is that most women like that style.

A while ago, we promised to write an exploration of fashion and patriarchy. Indeed, the only fashion that men can appreciate is the one that pleases them. Consequently, that is the most popular style among women, and therefore, that is the best-selling fashion.

Now pair Franchi’s retrograde words with the recent news that three girls couldn’t enter a bar on the beach near Ostia because their clothes weren’t sexy enough. So what do we see? The disturbing picture of a society where there’s no chance for women. No evolution.

And we just needed a woman to remind us about it! Chronicles from the Middle-Ages, that’s it!

The Silk Double Dress

Timeless nonchalant elegance

Today we introduce The Silk Double Dress – by Marc Le Bihan.

Fashion to us means offering a value choice, meaningful pieces made to last. And creativity, together with artisanal production, makes fashion special. Indeed, these elements give life to unique garments, beautiful pieces that you don’t find everywhere. And it is part of their intrinsic value.

When it comes to searching for uniqueness, creativity, and artisanal work, Marc Le Bihan has a lot to say. So let’s discover another one of the stunning timeless pieces we picked out for the Spring-Summer season.

The Silk Double Dress

About the design
This lightweight dress is made of two layers of silk featuring an asymmetrical cut and under knee-length. Specifically, they are two separate dresses, which you can wear all together or just one. A tone-on-tone Chantelle lace along the neckline and a front lace flower enrich the above dress. The second dress is less decorated, with boat lace detailed neckline and lace along the hemline. 

The Silk Double Dress
The Silk Double Dress
by Marc Le Bihan

About the material
100% silk. The hand is soft and slightly shiny. Moreover, its creased effect makes this dress suitable not only for special occasions but for a dose of nonchalant elegance.

About the colour
Bronze: a delicate dusty shade that adds a sophisticated touch. The image is impalpable and refined.

Laundry
Dry clean.
However, it is possible to wash carefully by hand in cold water with very soft soap and add white vinegar to prevent colour loss.

When you wear the complete ensemble, The Silk Double Dress is opulent but effortless at the same time. If you choose to wear only one layer requires a slip dress under, and even if less rich, the image is always beautiful. 
For special occasions, pair it with minimal heels. Or, try it with lace-ups or flat sandals for a nonchalant outfit.

Drop us a message for any further information. We’d love to assist you!

The Met Gala circus

Bad taste portrayed

People may think that events such as Met Gala offer hints of elegance. Please, forget it. Raised eyebrows were our reaction to viewing the pictures, not for facial gymnastics but as a sign of perplexity. What’s the point of that insane parade?

Our last post was about elegance, what went wrong with it, why bad taste prevailed, and here comes the Met Gala to present further suggestions.

Met Gala – What is it?

Born for the purpose of charity, Met Gala is the annual fundraising event of the Costume Institute Gala by the New York Metropolitan Museum Of Art. Every year there’s a different theme, and so the guests have to dress for that theme.

The problem is that dressing to a theme got out of hand. So now we see celebrities dressed as clowns whose unspoken message is a cry for attention, an attitude that resembles social media communication. And so, even if the charitable purpose is worthy, the sad show offered by the clownesque looks makes it seem paradoxical.

Tom Ford, who showed up in a classic black tailcoat, said: “I don’t really do themes”. Also, he declared that the event turned “into a costume party”. We couldn’t agree more. Tom Ford’s words were really on point. Like his outfit, which was impeccable. Elegant indeed.

Lately, the Met Gala looks recalled more of the “Carnevale di Viareggio” rather than a stylish event. (Side note: Carnevale di Viareggio is one of the biggest carnival shows in Italy and the world).

Finally, we go back to the point: elegance is dead, and there are no style icons. In other words, we are in the bad taste era, where the language that dominates is the social media language, and the need to impress others is all that counts.

Met Gala? Elegance has nothing to do with that.

The diffusion of bad taste

Why elegance is dead

Bad taste has never been so dominant. You see it in fashion magazines, street style outfits, events, workplaces, everywhere.
People cannot dress properly. And dressing up depending on the occasion does not seem to be a rule, so the dress code is dead along with elegance.
Definitely, we can say that bad taste has caught on. Yet, they call it fashion!

Good taste is not limited to luxury clothes. Indeed, we see many rich people wearing expensive clothes, but without a trace of elegance.
Just scroll through your social media, and the show is served with disarmingly gross images. But the same tacky style dominates television too. There are no icons of elegance anymore.

About elegance

We came across this interview Stefano Pilati released to Vice in 2012. Still very current and worth reading. We quote him:

“My idea of elegance—and this refers to women as well as men—is that someone is elegant when he or she shows a good knowledge of what fits them, where you can find naturalness and self-esteem. Not showing off. Elegance is the idea of showing an optimistic depiction of oneself and to lose oneself in the frivolity of style and fashion. Nowadays nobody gives a shit about being elegant, or chic. If you’re doing it, you’re doing it for yourself, because it’s your way of being. When you’re not thinking, “This is fashion,” and you’re not buying clothes to create statements, you’re on the right path. If fashion goes low waisted and you’re fat bottomed, well, forget it; don’t put slim-fitting jeans on. They’re going to look awful on you. You should dress in black; it would be better.

But seriously, it’s not easy to find elegant women. There are a few, the majority of whom are old—and there are one or maybe two in the world who created a new style when they were young. Today when I go to New York and survey art and fashion, I see smart women and the level is high. But there’s a difference between this and saying a woman is elegant.”

Clearly, the downfall started a while ago, it’s just more evident now.

The bad taste era – What went wrong?

The diffusion of bad taste is a phenomenon strictly connected to the decadence of our society. To put it another way, it is a cultural issue. In a context of growing uncertainty, we lost the points of reference. Many rules and roles collapsed. We seemed to have acquired certain freedom, which unfortunately reveals more about rudeness and lack of manners than freedom of expression.

If elegance is a dying breed, the problem is rooted in our society.
Culture is at the heart of the issue, but if elegance is dead and bad taste takes its place, it signifies our culture is in a poor state.

We should rediscover a sense of limit and dignity.

The Asymmetric Silk Top

Uncompromised fashion

Finally, and long-awaited, today we introduce The Asymmetric Silk Top – by Marc Le Bihan.

After giving you more information about the work of Marc Le Bihan designer and his uncompromised vision of fashion, it’s time to discover his unique pieces.

What stands out is that garments designed with mastery don’t need marketing labels (which are frequently fluff or fake). Why? Because those pieces have a soul. Therefore, they incapsulate all the values such as timelessness and sustainability now popular in fashion. But for a more selected audience who can understand good design and quality, straight to the point.

Discover The Asymmetric Silk Top

About the design
The idea starts from a slip top, two thin straps and a v neckline along the front and back. Two overlapped layers of silk, with raw-cut hemline, shape an asymmetric drape along the right side, which recalls a long tail. Indeed, in the unique silhouette and richness of the material lies the absolute beauty of the design.

About the material
100% silk. The hand is soft and slightly shiny. Moreover, its creased effect makes this top suitable not only for special occasions but for a dose of nonchalant elegance.

The Asymmetric Silk Top
The Asymmetric Silk Top
by Marc Le Bihan

About the colour
Rose poudre: a delicate dusty shade which is feminine and easy to match.

Laundry
Dry clean.
However, it is possible to wash carefully by hand in cold water with very soft soap and add white vinegar to prevent colour loss.

This statement top is seasonless and timeless, and it works from elegant to refined-cool situations.
Our styling tips: try it with a maxi skirt or a white or black tuxedo for elegant occasions. But we like it with red or denim too for aperitivo or dinner. And why not with a pair of shorts and flat sandals for your summer evenings.

The Asymmetric Silk Top will make you feel unique wherever you are.

Drop us a message for any further information. We’d love to help!

Artisanal, creative, independent

The value of exceptional work

The work of Marc Le Bihan represents a meaningful business model. And so, before showing you his gorgeous clothes, we wanted to share the conversation we had again.
Because it is not about standardised fashion. So, please, take time to know more, to understand the quality and the value offered. 

Marc Le Bihan is a fashion designer, artist, and craftsman who creates clothes like a second skin. His work goes beyond any classification. His conceptual creativity – manifested through impeccable tailoring, is the expression of a cultured and timeless approach to fashion that refuses trends and their transience.

Completely disconnected from commercial fashion constraints, his couture is a rare example of consistency.

Marc Le Bihan – The interview

• What does it mean to be consistent? Keeping up with your vision when the rest of the world goes in a different direction?

Marc Le Bihan: “The other direction is not my world. I do not understand it. To me, it’s a problem of society. I don’t understand the way of being, the lifestyle. That world is not me, and I can’t even think about it.

Usually, I don’t watch TV. Yesterday I watched Italian TV, and I wondered, how is it possible? Women pretend to be free, showing exaggerated lips and boobs. But in that, I only see the reflection of a man’s vision. That is not freedom. It’s the fake image of a woman.”

• The state of fashion now. How do you see it?

Marc Le Bihan: “The problem with fashion is that people only see the lights, the famous people. There is no sensibility to go further. Branded products are not luxury, not anymore. Luxury is rare, and it’s not for all.

To me, it’s not about fashion but more about doing clothes my way. The two roads can cross each other but not as direction to follow.”

• What do you think about social media communication?

Marc Le Bihan: “Famous people promote everything. They get paid to sell, it’s all about money. And not only for fashion. Maybe they promote a food they didn’t even taste. We live in the culture of image, not real life. People don’t live the moment, take pictures. And everything is ego-centred. People have lost the meaning of quality and quality of life.

That is why I follow my path.

Our communication is not to do any communication. Everything is too confused, there’s too much of it. We don’t have time for social media, we are busy making clothes. However, it’s not about posting a thousand things. Sometimes we post. Enough.”

Marc Le Bihan top

The cultural issue

• It’s a matter of culture and education?

Marc Le Bihan: “Always. The first problem is education, for everything.

The idea of accessing through culture and education to something higher – is dead. And I am concerned about young kids. Now they are totally immersed in this image game.”

Sustainability vs Marketing

• What do you think about sustainability?

Marc Le Bihan: “Well, I did it 20 years ago! We were recycling and upcycling uniforms and parachutes. I don’t want to be a part of that circle because everybody is doing it. It’s marketing. To me, it’s more about how we consume and live. Of course, I use sustainable materials, but I don’t advertise. To claim it means being part of the system.

My idea is to keep a garment for ten years in the wardrobe, then take it out and still want to wear it because it’s timeless.

Mine is a work in progress. If a shirt is good, it’s good forever.”

“Couture is sustainable by definition. There is no overproduction, no minimum orders, and no sales. We produce only on orders, and everything is handmade. Moreover, we find our balance not in over profit. But if everybody gets well paid, we all can live.

My staff has been working with me for 25 years. Always the same people, same suppliers. We understand each other.

We work like this. Many pieces are made in casa, a la maison, in our atelier.”

And he smiled saying those words. Stubbornly showing a path that is a return to the essential, pure artisanal creativity.

The work of Marc Le Bihan: sustainable, indeed

The work of Marc Le Bihan is artisanal, creative, and independent. Though a rarity in the fashion system, it indicates a valuable business model for a sustainable future.

Earth day?

Mass marketing, hashtags and behaviour

On April 22, while everyone proudly shared the hashtag Earth Day, the news said that in Europe, six million tons of garments end up in landfills every year. Yes, it’s not a good moment to read newspapers because whatever the field, humans are not shining for responsible behaviour.

Even if we feel very sad about that news, we are not surprised. Indeed one of our latest posts was about the lack of coherence in our society. And scrolling through our blog, you’ll find many other posts on this topic. On the one hand, people talk like they care about sustainability, while on the other, they buy fast fashion or any cheap product. The habit is ‘consume and throw away’ quickly.

In general, sustainability sells, and if it’s greenwashing, it sells even more!

Earth Day & the culture of waste

This matter has to do with the ‘buy and toss’ culture launched, promoted and pushed by corporations. They did it intentionally by using persuasion and with the help of marketing. Yes, marketing can do magic! Furthermore, knowing they could count not only on the weakness of individuals but also on people who don’t read and don’t think at all.

This is the modern way of purchasing clothing which is also done via Instagram or TikTok. The cheapest ones are the most successful. “It’s cheap, I buy it, I’ll wear it once and throw it away!”
What if they will not wear it? They won’t feel guilty getting rid of it because it’s cheap. In fact, there are garments still with the price tag in landfills!

That is toxic behaviour that tells a lot about the decadence of European culture. Our parents and grandparents used to buy a few quality clothes that lasted a lifetime, got repaired and passed on to the other family members. Now, people buy very cheap products made to auto destroy in the shortest time possible. And which, unfortunately, don’t disappear but instead compromise our environment.

If we do not refocus our culture, if we are not open to change, and put some effort into shifting our consuming habits, it’s better to avoid the hashtag to celebrate Earth Day.

Hashtags work for marketing but will not save the earth. Our actions will.

The Asymmetric Fluo Cotton Sweater

The light green version

The item we introduce today is The Asymmetric Fluo Cotton Sweater by ZUCCa.

The line is stylish, comfortable and easy to wear. Also, the concept of asymmetric design is something we really like because it’s modern and unusual, and it looks great when you wear it.
We already showed you the purple version a couple of weeks ago, and we are happy you enjoyed it! Since this pull is a new classic, we decided to select another colour too, which is a stronger version.

By the way, the quantities we order are limited, and this is intentional. In fact, the idea is to create unique outfits and not replicate clones you see everywhere.

Discover The Asymmetric Fluo Sweater

About the design
The sweater features a round neck and asymmetric hemline. A robust seam along the front and side highlights the mix of the two different thicknesses of the same material. The seam details the shoulders too.
Ribbed neckline, cuffs and hem. The silhouette is slightly oversized and unisex.

The Asymmetric Fluo Cotton Sweater
The Asymmetric Fluo Cotton Sweater
by ZUCCa

About the material
100% cotton, non-glossy. It is made by knitting 100% soft cotton yarn into the high and middle gauge and docking it. The material has a thin thickness with a certain elasticity.

About the colour
Light green: a vibrant colour that makes it a bold piece, not for everyone. But this bright hue will give you an instant mood boost.

Laundry
Hand washable, easy-care.
You can wash this item by hand at home.

This new season item is a versatile modern garment that offers multiple styling options. Even though it’s a bold colour, it’s easy to mix and match. It’s perfect with white pants, but you can also pair it with navy, denim or black bottoms.

The Asymmetric Fluo Cotton Sweater is timeless, genderless and stylish.

Drop us an email or DM for any further info. We’d love to help!

The coherence gap

Sustainability vs fast-fashion growth

Our society has a problem with consistency. Indeed one point seems quite clear: what people say is not consistent with what they do. It’s like coherence is a fault, or it’s not necessary. So you are allowed to say something and then do the opposite without being held accountable.

Consistency and sustainability

Magazines these days released the news that Shein, the fast-fashion giant, is raising funds at 100 billion USD value.
Considering that their price range is around 10 – 20 euros, two things are certain. First, the materials have zero quality. Second, their production chains cause serious doubts. If 15 euros is the price of one dress, how much are workers getting paid to make that garment?
Quality can be something one could renounce, but an ethical production chain is the foundation of a healthy society. And therefore, crucial in any discussion, even about sustainability.

Yet no questions arise in those who buy Shein. In fact, in a moment when communication and marketing are all about sustainability, the fast-fashion giant is growing enormously. And there is similar news too. Recently Primark opened in Milano, and people were packed in line to get in.

Overcoming the coherence gap

People talk about sustainability and maybe show up at ‘Friday’s for Future’, but they buy fast fashion. Why?
Everyone, adults and teenagers, say something, but they do the opposite. This lack of consistency reveals that sustainability is just a marketing trend. It is a popular topic, something people like to discuss to show they are up-to-date, but they don’t really care.

Because if they were consistent, they wouldn’t buy fast fashion at all! And the case of low budgets is just an excuse to avoid the change since the business model is profitable for corporations and “convenient” for short-sighted masses. Vintage items are accessible to anyone, and nothing is more sustainable.

So, here’s the way to overcome the coherence gap: let actions follow thoughts. In the same direction, of course!