Decoding the sexy trend

From New York to Milano and Paris runways, the sexy trend was one of the most prominent themes for next Spring/Summer 22.

Cut-out tops and pants, catsuits, ultra-mini skirts, mid-riff – covering the body just enough and leaving little to the imagination. If still there’s something to imagine, considering the quality of images shared on social media. In that context, the appreciation of freedom stops at the possibility of showing themselves naked.

Ironically, we first wondered if designers knew that, during the pandemic, people put on weight. But don’t feel sad, if you want to wear your catsuit you have about four months to get in perfect shape!

However, keeping irony aside, let’s analyze the meaning of the style proposal that came out as the designers’ favourite.

Fashion journalists reported this trend as an expression of joy, a celebration for a much-awaited return to social life. After more than a year in lockdown, people mainly wore jumpsuits or pyjamas. Now they are eager to enjoy dinners and parties. So the night out mood is on.

Although we understand the desire for sociality, we believe the sexy trend hides a much different motivation. The way a designer can portray evening style doesn’t necessarily imply promoting a hooker outfit.

We disagree with this pre-packed story. And so, we try to see it from a different socio-cultural-economic perspective.

We read the sexy trend as the trite vision of a woman dressed up to have a hold on a man. Does it sound new to you? To us, it seems so status quo.

It is old as the story of the universe. And, what’s more? It sells.
Indeed marketers use sex to sell everything. Furthermore, at this specific moment, the urgent need is to make money to cover the economic losses caused by the pandemic. Money, easy and fast.

So, here you are, served with the sexy doll. The same old perpetuated stereotype. As the most accessible short-term benefit.

What a breath of fresh air, we might say!